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What is a Landfill?

A landfill is an area of land that is used to dump garbage, either directly on the ground (landraising) or filling an unwanted hole in the ground (landfilling).

Most modern landfills are engineered and managed facilities for the disposal of solid waste. Landfills are located, designed, operated, and monitored to ensure compliance with stingent rules and regulations. They are also designed to protect the environment from contaminants, which may be present in the waste stream and have on-site environmental monitoring systems. These monitoring systems are put in place to check for any sign of groundwater contamination and for landfill gas, as well as provide additional safeguards.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the United States, landfills must meet stringent design, operation and closure requirements established under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

Why do we need landfills?

We need landfill so that trash (also referred to as garbage) can be disposed properly. 

In days past, it wasn't uncommon for all trash to find itself headed to a landfill (or dump). But environmental consciousness has taught us to be frugal with our waste. These days, it has become a very common practice for consumers to separate their trash into proper categories before it is hauled away by the garbage collection companies, who work as outside contractors for respective municipalities. 

General trash/garbage categories include:

  • Municipal Solid Waste (organic waste) 
  • Greens and clippings (from our gardens)
  • Recyclable Goods (cans, bottles, newspapers, and cardboard)

The idea is to ensure that trash is handled in a manner that ensures minimal impact on a landfill. In fact, new technologies are being developed to reduce the amount of rubbish that is sent to landfill each year. The most common items found these days in landfills comes from construction and commercial businesses, such as soil, concrete and brick rubble. This is known as inert waste because it is unlikely to react with other rubbish, making it relatively safe for landfill.

In days past, it wasn't uncommon for all trash to find itself headed to a landfill (or dump). But environmental consciousness has taught us to be frugal with our waste. These days, it has become a very common practice for consumers to separate their trash into proper categories before it is hauled away by the garbage collection companies, who work as outside contractors for respective municipalities.

General trash/garbage categories include:

·          Municipal Solid Waste (organic waste)

·          Greens and clippings (from our gardens)

·          Recyclable Goods (cans, bottles, newspapers, and cardboard)

The idea is to ensure that trash is handled in a manner that ensures minimal impact on a landfill.

News/Events 

  1. Is Big Gas finally learning to love biogas?
  2. We need to get behind Renewable Natural Gas
  3. Difference between a Turbo and Positive Displacement Blower
  4. The Difference between Methane and Natural Gas
  5. First Dairy Biogas Project in Connecticut
  6. Does Renewable Natural Gas Have a Future in Energy?
  7. Biogas Offtake Opportunities For Digesters
  8. Wisconsin Dairy Begins Production of Renewable Natural Gas
  9. Anaerobic Digestion Sector Forming a Clearer Picture
  10. Brightmark to Expand Western New York Dairy Biogas Project
  11. Biogas - The Energy Wonder That's Under Our Noses
  12. Power Generation Achieved by a Self-Assembled Biofuel Cell
  13. Less Carbon Dioxide from Natural Gas
  14. Project Uses Renewable Electricity for RNG Production
  15. Smithfield Hog Farm Provides Natural Gas to Missouri City
  16. From Waste to Gas
  17. Gas Clash Threatens Australian Export
  18. Maximizing Opportunities of Anaerobic Digestion from Wastewater
  19. Catalyst to Speed up Conversion of Biomass to Biofuel
  20. How It Works: Ethanol
  21. Anaerobic Digestion - the Next Big Renewable Energy Source
  22. Anaerobic Additions
  23. Three (3) Tech Solutions for Modern Landfills
  24. The Costs and Benefits of Anaerobic Digesters
  25. Bacteria Farts Power Wastewater Plant in Fort Wayne
  26. Europe’s First Poultry Manure Biogas Plant
  27. Electricity Using Pig Manure
  28. $38-Million Biodigester coming to Grand Rapids
  29. Biochar Could Benefit Anaerobic Digestion of Animal Manure
  30. Getting More out of Anaerobic Digestion

 

For additonal reading, please visit us at: News Worthy

Difference between a Turbo and Positive Displacement Blower